Coastal Cleanup Day volunteers remove more than 5,000 pounds of trash in three hours

A volunteer at the Trout Unlimited South Coast chapter LA River cleanup joined 2,735 others on Saturday, Sept. 18, at 35 beach, river and inland sites in Los Angeles County for the 32nd Annual #CoastalCleanupDay. Volunteers covered 50-plus miles of area on land and underwater—removing 5,051 pounds of trash and 156 pounds of recyclables in three hours. (Credit: Miranda Robin)

Two events for Saturday consideration

Join South Coast Trout Unlimited in its continuing partnership with Heal the Bay for their Coastal Cleanup Day.

We will be cleaning up the Los Angeles River and the adjacent park areas, from 9 a.m. until noon this Saturday (Sept. 18). Gloves and trash bags will be provided.

Most of the trash in the streets and parks make their way into the watershed via storm drains and eventually the ocean. You are doing your part to reduce the giant islands of plastic found floating in the middle of the ocean.

Please wear a hat and comfortable closed-toed shoes. Sunscreen and Hand sanitizer will be provided.

Stick around for the amazing raffle prizes as each participant will be given a raffle ticket, you might win a fishing pole

🎣

Meet at Lewis MacAdams Riverfront Park.

AND

SCTU is working on the Lower LA River, so drop by our booth and learn more about the Lower LA River Restoration and Access project.

LA River End Of Summer Festival
Saturday, September 18
9am-2pm
Hollydale Park: 5400 Monroe Avenue South Gate, CA 90280We have just launched the Lower LA River Channel Restoration and Access project page. Check it out here to learn more about the background and goals of this grant project. The conceptual designs are a first step in creating a naturalized bottom in the Lower LA River.

Checkmate: EPA to protect Alaska’s Bristol Bay, blocking major gold mine

Bristol Bay’s salmon spawning grounds sustain a commercial fishing industry that generates more than $2 billion every year. (Courtesy Wild Salmon Center)

From the Washington Post: “The Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday that it would restore protections for Alaska’s Bristol Bay, blocking the construction of a massive and controversial gold mine near the world’s largest sockeye salmon run.

The policy shift, indicated in a court filing Thursday in response to a lawsuit filed by the mine’s opponents, deals a serious blow to a project that has been in the works for more than a decade and would have transformed southwest Alaska’s landscape.” Read the whole story.

SCTU’s final summer fishing event reels in LA River carp

Enter the annual Trout Unlimited/Orvis Teens Essay by Oct. 1

Vamos a Pescar participants Ethan and Hailey get a good look at a juvenile carp before releasing it back to the LA River. (Credit Miranda Robin)

From the contest organizers:

Public green and blue spaces can hold varying levels of importance and interest for people, but they all have one thing in common: endless opportunity for exploration.

For folks living in cities, public spaces such as neighborhood parks and greenways; woods and gardens; or ponds and lakesides are a respite from summer heat and provide space for physical activity. For those who live close to public lands such as U.S. Forest Service land or a national park, public lands can offer camping, hiking and biking trails. Plus, public lands and urban green spaces provide ample opportunity to wet a line.

Trout Unlimited is teaming up with Orvis to make our annual TU Teens Essay Contest the best ever. We want to hear from any young person between the ages of 12 and 18 why public spaces and lands are important to them. Judges will choose winners from two categories: eighth grade to 10th grade, and 11th and 12th grade. The deadline is Oct. 1.

When teens enter our TU Teen Essay contest, they get the chance to win a new Orvis Helios 3 outfit plus have their winning essay published in TROUT magazine. Second place teen essayists can choose between an Orvis Recon outfit or Orvis Bug Out backpack; third place will choose between an Orvis Clearwater outfit or Orvis Guide Sling/Tote combo.

Visit www.tu.org/teen-essays for the essay prompt, contest rules and details. Contact Brett Prettyman with questions and to enter. We can’t wait to hear from you.

USDA Forest Service Temporarily Closing All California National Forests for Public Safety

Release Date: Aug 30, 2021

Contact(s): Public Inquiries, Media Inquiries

PDF of this news release

Link to Regional Order

VALLEJO, Calif., — August 30, 2021. To better provide public and firefighter safety due to the ongoing California wildfire crisis, USDA Forest Service Pacific Southwest Region is announcing a temporary closure of all National Forests in California. This closure will be in effect from Aug. 31, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. through September 17, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. This order does not affect the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, which is not in the Pacific Southwest Region.

“We do not take this decision lightly but this is the best choice for public safety,” said Regional Forester Jennifer Eberlien. “It is especially hard with the approaching Labor Day weekend, when so many people enjoy our national forests.”

Factors that led to this decision include:

1. By temporarily reducing the numbers of people on national forests, we hope to minimize the likelihood that visitors could become entrapped on National Forest System lands during emergency circumstances.

2. The closure order will also decrease the potential for new fire starts at a time of extremely limited firefighting resources, and enhance firefighter and community safety by limiting exposure that occurs in public evacuation situations, especially as COVID-19 continues to impact human health and strain hospital resources.

3. Due to state-wide conditions, any new fire starts have the potential for large and rapid fire growth with a high risk to life and property. The Forest Service and our partners are absolutely doing all we can to fight these fires and will continue to do so, but the conditions dictate the need for this region-wide closure order.

4. Forecasts show that conditions this season are trending the same or worse as we move into late summer and fall.

5. Although the potential for large fires and risk to life and property is not new, what is different is that we are facing: (a) record level fuel and fire conditions; (b) fire behavior that is beyond the norm of our experience and models such as large, quick runs in the night; (c) significantly limited initial attack resources, suppression resources, and Incident Command Teams to combat new fire starts and new large fires; and (d) no predicted weather relief for an extended period of time into the late fall.

‘The Los Angeles River’ goes on preorder

From Peter Bennett:

Now on sale. The time has finally come, my LA River book is soon heading to the printer and I am taking orders for both the hardcover and the softcover editions. https://www.citizenoftheplanet.com/lariverbook

When I first started this project, I made a decision to self-publish. This book means a lot to me having spent over twelve years documenting the river. By self-publishing, I felt I could maintain the creative control necessary to tell the story of the river in a way I thought it deserved.

But in order to afford the printing costs, I need to sell as many copies as I can ahead of time. I have tried to keep the prices as low as possible and still cover my costs.

I will be sending to the printer in September and should have copies to deliver by the middle of November, just in time for the holidays (should make a great gift).

The book looks beautiful, I think everyone will really like it.  Thank you so much for the support.

Going to Mammoth? Fish before noon, CDFW says in new voluntary hoot-owl guidelines

PRESS RELEASE: The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is asking recreational anglers to voluntarily change how, when and where they fish to minimize stress and mortality among fish populations suffering from drought conditions.

CDFW is advising anglers not to fish past noon on certain inland waters as even catch-and-release angling during the hottest parts of the day can greatly increase fish stress and mortality.

“Many of our inland fisheries that rely on cold water habitat will likely be significantly impacted in the short and long term,” said CDFW Inland Fisheries Manager Roger Bloom. “California’s drought cycles have required us to learn to manage fisheries with extreme variations in water flows. The last drought resulted in significant effects to fisheries that took years to recover from. We hope the self-imposed Hoot Owl restrictions by anglers will help mitigate those effects.”

Coldwater species such as trout, salmon and steelhead have the greatest likelihood of being affected by the drought this year but low water levels and high-water temperatures can potentially affect all inland aquatic species.

CDFW has introduced a series of voluntary angling recommendations – so-called “Hoot Owl” Restrictions – that directs anglers to focus their fishing during the cooler “hoot owl” periods of the day when water temperatures are lowest. A watchlist of specific waters anglers should avoid fishing past noon is included and will be updated as conditions change. Sustained afternoon water temperatures exceeding 67 degrees Fahrenheit for trout fisheries could trigger addition to the list.

Currently, the list of waters include:

  • Lower Owens River (Pleasant Valley Dam downstream to Five Bridges) in Mono County
  • Hot Creek in Mono County
  • Mill Creek (Walker Basin) in Mono County
  • Lower Rush Creek (Grant Lake to Mono Lake) in Mono County
  • Bridgeport Reservoir in Mono County
  • Deep Creek (San Bernardino County)
  • Crowley Lake (Mono County)
  • Truckee River (Lake Tahoe to the Nevada state line) in Nevada, Placer and Sierra counties

As conditions change, CDFW will post the updated list on the “Hoot Owl” Restrictions page.

Elevated water temperatures, lower oxygen levels, disease, low flows and low water levels are among the drought-related effects impacting many of California’s coastal waters and inland fisheries.

CDFW offers a number of other angling tips to reduce fish stress during the drought:

  • Minimize the time you spend “fighting” the fish and any hands-on handling.
  • Use rubber or coated nylon nets to protect a fish’s slime layer and fins.
  • Quickly remove the hook with forceps or needle-nosed pliers.
  • Minimize the amount of time the fish is exposed to air, especially when the weather is warm.
  • Keep your hands wet when handling the fish. 
  • If the fish is deeply hooked, do not pull on the line. Instead, cut the line as close as possible to where it is hooked and leave the hook so it can dissolve.
  • Allow the fish to recover in the net before you release it.
  • If the fish does not stay upright when you release it, gently move it back and forth.
  • Avoid fighting fish from deeper, cooler waters and bringing them into warmer waters at the surface if your intention is to release them.
  • Target fisheries that have stable water levels and species that are more resilient to elevated temperatures.

While theses best practices may not all apply to anglers interested in harvesting their fish to eat, mortality may result from non-targeted species caught and released or fish outside of legal size limits that must be returned to the water.