National Day of Unplugging begins at sundown

Could ‘carp dogs’ become the hot dog of the future? (Courtesy Kunzler).

Ever wonder how the cellphone swallowed your life?

That, I can’t answer, but I can recommend that from sundown tonight through Saturday, you and your family uplug! Even if just for an hour, give it a shot.

 Check out this video:

https://abc7chicago.com/national-day-of-unplugging-2022-social-media-tv-shows-online-games/11619538/

And these resources for more. 

https://www.nationaldayofunplugging.com/

Let me know how it goes. — Jim

Ueda’s ‘Planet Carp’ splashes down in Pasadena

Holy mackerel, that’s some slab, Glen! (Courtesy Pasadena Casting Club)
There are literally miles and miles of carp water throughout Southern California and beyond. Some of these watersheds literally untouched and ready to reward the intrepid fly fisher. 

Please plan on attending his presentation “Planet Carp” as Glenn Ueda will be sharing his experiences over the past decade, personal fly fishing tackle, and specific techniques when sightfishing for carp.

A native of Southern California, Glenn was introduced to surf fishing as a child by his father. Every Sunday, from Morro Bay down to San Onofre, they caught their own bait and targeted everything from striped bass to barred perch to corbina. Reading about fly fishing in Field and Stream, Glenn soon learned basic fly casting and tying at world famous Long Beach Casting Club, He was ten. A local pond provided endless joy fooling bluegill, crappie and bass. Almost five decades later following a rewarding career as an architect, he sought new challenges. Taking all of those cherished surf and freshwater lessons he built a very successful business “So Cal Flats Fishing Guide Service” teaching fly anglers the art of sightfishing in shallow surf for one of the world’s most challenging species, the California Corbina. Guiding highly skilled anglers from all over the globe, many agree after a day’ of stalking that they our “Ghost of the Coast” is as difficult if not worse than the very popular and highly coveted flats permit.

Thursday, March 10, 7 p.m.

San Marino Masonic Lodge
3130 Huntington Drive
San Marino, CA 91108

Editor’s Note: This is the monthly meeting for members of Pasadena Casting Club, but non-members are also invited to attend. It’s free.

Here comes the first annual Trout Rodeo!

Click here to register with iAngler for the Rodeo

Click here for Team Payment of $20.00

Welcome to the first ever Trout Rodeo, which will be Bishop, California on February 26, 2022! This catch and release tournament is a challenge to ALL anglers to see who comes out on top. The event is open to fly and conventional anglers and we have made it easy to be a part of it!

Cost– $25 per person.

Teams – There is an additional fee ($20) if you want to compete in the team category and there will be separate prizes for each team member. To compete as a team, you must designate a Team Leader as all participants need to register individually and the leader will place you on the team. The cost of being a team can be split among the members but cannot be handled within iAngler.

Other Categories – There will be separate categories for fly caught and lure caught along with separate prizes. If you are a licensed guide or lodge/retail owner, you may participate in a separate category for no cost. If you are affiliated with Casting For Recovery and/or Project Healing Waters, there is no charge for you to participate as an individual or as a team. If you are in this category, please contact Graham or Michael for the passcode.

Scoring – All individual anglers MUST register and use the iAngler app (https://www.ianglertournament.com/2022-bishop-trout-rodeo). This app allows you to photograph and record your catch, where it is then sent to the event administrator for scoring. Fish must be measured from the tip of their nose to the fork of their tail and rounded to the next lowest ¼”. All species available (trout, carp and bass) will count towards your total score and must be released. All catches must be photographed with your phone for verification. All flies and lures MUST be a single hook and de-barbed. In the case of lures, replacing your treble hook with a single barbless hook is fine. Foul hooked fish (not mouth hooked) will not be counted. Scores for each individual will be totaled and finalists (1st, 2nd, 3rd) determined.

Team Scoring – total score for the team will be divided by the number of members and that number will determine your place. So teams of ANY SIZE are accepted.

iAngler will “hold” the record of your catch until your phone can get Internet coverage and at that point, will download your catches to the event administrator for scoring. All catches MUST be caught during the designated time of the tournament (9 a.m. – 4 p.m.) and within the eligible waters as listed below. Your catch is automatically time and location stamped.

Awards and Prizes – There will be three winners in each category (fly, gear, fly team, gear team, non-profits). Each winner will be awarded raffle tickets to be used in the giant raffle of goods following the event. Award levels are listed below. Any participant in the Tournament can buy additional ticket through our on-line portals

1st place individual – 100 tix1st place team – 50 tix each
2nd place individual – 50 tix2nd place team – 20 tix each
3rd place individual – 20 tix3rd place team – 10 tix each

Additional raffle tickets may be purchased at the event

$1.00 – 1 ticket
$5.00 – 6 tickets
$20.00 – 30 tickets
$50.00 – 100 tickets

Hours of event
7 a.m. – 8 a.m. – Registration happens when you sign in with the iAngler app. But we are asking everyone to meet at the Tri-County Fairgrounds parking lot for a quick Q&A (if you have any) and to wish everyone luck. if you have any questions ahead of or during the event, we will be available by phone. Michael Schweit 818.6019702, Graham Day 562.2219340. You MUST be signed into iAngler before the start time of 9 a.m. so please plan accordingly. Before the event, you will need to download and install iAngler. Once you are signed in to the event, you are responsible for taking photographs and measurements.

9 a.m. – 4 p.m. – head out and fish your favorite area! Feel free to move around but be sure not to crowd other anglers.
6 p.m. – 9 p.m. – At this point, we are hoping we can have a dinner, raffles and awards at the Tri-County Fairgrounds. This is all subject to Covid restrictions and will be announced closer to the event. Winners will be announced that night in some shape or form!

Eligible Waters – With the DFW regulations changes, there are many additional waters open to fishing at this time of year. So rather than limiting the fishing areas to the Lower Owens and Pleasant Valley Reservoir, we are expanding the area to Long Ears in the north (Upper Owens) all the way down to Independence in the south. You still need to be fishing waters that are designated as open and follow all DFW regulations on this matter. And as we do not know the weather for the day of the event, we leave it up to each contestant to fish with safety in mind. You need to allow enough time to get a cell signal so your catch is transferred to us no later than 4:30 p.m. and to be back at the Tri-County Fairgrounds by 6 for awards and prize drawings.

We have signed up with The Rolling Chef 395 Food Truck to be at the Fairgrounds by 5:30 so you can grab a bite before awards and prizes.

Lodging – there are campgrounds at Pleasant Valley Reservoir and many hotels/motels in Bishop. We are working on event pricing.

Covid 19 – Participants agree to wear a facial covering (over mouth and nose) when indoors or when outdoors and within 6 feet of persons from another household. While in Inyo County, they take face covering seriously when indoors or when outdoors without physical distancing.

Could water-hungry cities starve the LA River of treated waste water? The answer could mean bad news for habitat renewal

What most Angelinos don’t realize is that 90% of the Los Angeles River’s water comes from treated waste water from Los Angeles, Burbank and  other local municipalities. (Credit: Bob Blankenship)

Read the entire article from the Los Angeles Times:

Just north of downtown — and a stone’s throw from the growling 5 Freeway — the concrete bed of the Los Angeles River gives way to soft earth and an explosion of riparian life: Cottonwood and sycamore trees push skyward, while fish dart beneath the swooping shadows of cackling waterfowl. The scents of mulefat scrub and sage hang in the air.

For many, it’s a vision of what the Los Angeles River looked like before it was transformed into a massive flood control channel. It also serves as a rallying point for those environmentalists who want to see the river returned to a more natural state.

But what few Angelenos realize is that for much of the year, this thriving river habitat is sustained by a constant flow of treated wastewater.

Although melting snowpack and torrential rains send water coursing along the river from time to time, most of the water originated from the sinks, dishwashers, bathtubs, toilets and washing machines of millions of homes and businesses before it was treated in sewage plants and released into the river.

Now, as climate change stokes recurring cycles of drought, cities are increasingly looking to recycle this treated wastewater even before it reaches the river’s graffiti-marred concrete. With Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti pledging to recycle 100% of the city’s wastewater by 2035, and the cities of Burbank and Glendale also looking to increase wastewater recycling, the 51-mile river has suddenly become a battleground between environmentalists and wastewater recycling advocates.

Proposed Cali ballot measure to build new dams goes bust

This view of Florence’s Lake’s dam from October, 2021, shows the extent of water loss from the continuing drought. It was built in 1926 as part of a hydroelectric project and captures water from the South Fork of the San Joaquin River in the western Sierra. (Credit: Jim Burns)

From the Mercury News:

Supporters of a proposed November ballot measure to provide billions of dollars to build new dams, desalination plants and other large water projects in California announced Tuesday they are ending their campaign due to lack of signatures and funding.

“Despite crafting an initiative that would solve California’s challenge of chronic and worsening water scarcity, and despite recent polling that indicates over 70% of California’s voters support increased state spending on water infrastructure, the campaign has been unable to attract the financial support necessary to gather the required 1 million signatures,” the campaign said in a statement.

Read the whole story here.

 L.A. River Ecosystem Restoration to receive $28 million from bipartisan infrastructure bill

@MayorofLA — Mayor Garcetti today celebrated $28 million in funding from the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law for the L.A. River Ecosystem Restoration project. This funding will enable habitat restoration near the Arroyo Seco confluence and the Taylor Yard site. 

A city button from when “riverly” was a thing. (Credit: Jim Burns)

“The L.A. River is one of Los Angeles’ crown jewels – a foundational piece of our city’s story. Now, it’s on us to make it shine for ourselves and future generations,” Mayor Garcetti said. “This $28 million investment by our federal partners – their largest to date in the river – caps off nearly a decade of progress and investment in our bold vision of the L.A. River’s future. I am deeply grateful to our Los Angeles Congressional delegation, as well as the Biden Administration for this funding, and I look forward to seeing the transformation continue as a lifelong Angeleno.”

The L.A. River Ecosystem Restoration project will restore 11 miles of the L.A. River from Griffith Park to Downtown Los Angeles. The city estimates this plan will generate 14,200 construction jobs and 2,670 permanent jobs. It will restore hundreds of acres for multiple plant and animal species and provide access to natural areas and trails for historically disadvantaged communities.  

During his first term, Mayor Garcetti personally lobbied the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for the approval of the L.A. River Ecosystem Restoration project. He led on the passage of Measure M in 2016 which funded a drastic expansion of the LA RiverWay bike path. In 2017, the city acquired the 42-acre G2 parcel at Taylor Yard to expand park-land around the river. The river restoration project has been a priority for the City of Los Angeles for more than 20 years and is reflected in the City’s 2007 Los Angeles River Revitalization Master Plan, which outlines the City’s vision for the future of the L.A. River as well as the numerous benefits that its revitalization will bring to diverse communities in the region.

TU Founder George Griffith and Michigan’s Au Sable River

IN THE DARK: The headlamp only comes on when you catch a brown trout. (Credit Will Burns)

One of the best fishing times my son and I ever shared together was at the Gates Lodge, fishing the fabled Au Sable River. It was the kind of father-son bonding trip I miss now that Will has a young family of his own. Searching for big browns one evening in an Au Sable river boat, we drifted past the birthplace of Trout Unlimited, the premier conservation organization for protecting cold water trout. Here is an except from its founder, George Griffith, from his memoir, “For the Love of Trout.” (out of print). Gates Lodge is now owned by writer Josh Greenberg. If you are planning a trip to Michigan, be sure to read his excellent book, “Rivers of Sand.

See you on the river, Jim Burns

“Change comes to everything, including the river. Often it is subtle, so subtle that it is difficult for a generation to accept new restrictions, size limits, slotting. Now it’s no-kill, spearheaded by Rusty Gates, second generation owner of Gates AuSable Lodge at Stephan’s Bridge, and the Anglers of the AuSable. Many river residents, and some guides, can’t see the Holy Waters as being off-limits to keeping trout even though statistics in the late ’80s showed 80 percent of the anglers were voluntarily returning their catches to the water by choice, not regulation.

Attitudes change, often with species and availability. Advocates like Gates can help bring about change. By the late ’40s, I already was more interested in the life and hazards of trout than in catching a limit every day, or taking trout home. However, few shared my growing concern for the river. Bob Behnke, who has a clearinghouse for biologists’ findings at the University of Colorado, wrote recently in Trout magazine about the “sportsmen,” who looked down on the “fish hogs,” who would take 100 trout. As Behnke says, they call themselves “conservationists” because they only kept their limits of 25 fish!”

HOLY WATERS: Present owner Josh Greenberg keeps Rusty’s spirit of sport fishing and conservation alive at the Gates Au Sable Lodge in Grayling, Michigan. (Credit Jim Burns)